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About the Game

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We play by the rules and customs of base ball as it was played in the 1860s.

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Looking for a game to play on Sept 21-23 ? Head to Branson, MO and join in on the fun as they present the Legacy Cup 2018. Plenty of opportunities for base ball during this event, and you can come as just a single player or a pair of players, and find a team to hook up with. More info upon request or contact event organizer Doug Ernst at quickstepsmanager@gmail.com for lots more info on the event. Get more base ball in before the bad weather finds us !! ...

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A post copied from another page that I found interesting enough to share to back up why we encourage people to play a FULL nine innings in the 1860s that most of us play.

Thank you Richard Hershberger for sharing.

Boston Globe March 3, 1874, reporting on the NA meeting of the previous day. This snippet is from the rules discussion, on the proposal to give clubs the option of skipping the bottom of the ninth if the batting side had the lead. While this idea was controversial, we (sadly) are not told the substance of the argument against it. My guess is kneejerk conservatism. In any case, the idea wasn't incorporated in the rules until A. G. Mills's revisions for 1880.

The 1874 rules as adopted did include the innovation that a game called on account of rain, with the top half completed and the team batting in the bottom half ahead, did not revert to the last completed inning's score. This was to reduce stalling by a trailing team in the face of imminent rain. I suspect that the two proposals, while not directly related, were inspired concurrently.

The rule set was drafted by Chadwick. He had no formal position in the NA, but he was still a respected authority, not yet regarded as an old coot. He also had access to a printing press, so he could pass out copies of his draft rules, hinting about how convenient it would be to simply adopt them verbatim. The NA didn't take that bait. This was the year that his ten-man ten-inning was brought to a vote. It went down in flames.
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New clubs starting up in Wytheviile, VA. If you know people in that area, invite them.
For the love of the game.
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This occured during the World Tournament in Michigan this past weekend, but serves as an excellent educational point for all of us that play, as it applies for at least all years of 1860s. If you read it and have questions, please use the comments and we will help clear anything up. It was the FINAL PLAY of the championship game..
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The final play of the championship match was one that might require some explanation. The situation was that it was the bottom of the ninth inning, the score was tied, there was one out, and runners were on first and third. The Lah-de-dahs were at the bat, with the Wheels in the field.
The striker hit a foul ball that stayed close to home base. The runner on first apparently did not initially hear the call of “foul,” and broke for second base. The Wheels saw an opportunity for an out, remembering Section 19 of the rules, which states “No run or base can be made upon a foul ball; such a ball shall be considered dead, and not in play until it shall first have been settled in the hands of the pitcher. In such cases, players running bases shall return to them, and maybe put out in so returning, in the same manner as when running to the first base.”
In other words, unlike modern baseball, baserunners do not get a “free return” to the base on a foul ball. In 1867, if the team on defense can field a foul ball, get it to the pitcher, and from there to the base the runner left from before the runner gets back to the base, the runner is out. No tag is required – if the ball beats the runner (and is held by the baseman), the runner is out.
However, there’s another part to Section 19. After a foul ball, runners have to go back to their bases to tag up, and must tag while or after the pitcher holds the ball. Once the pitcher holds the ball and the runner has tagged, runners are again free to run (i.e., to steal a base). When the Wheels’ pitcher received the foul ball from the catcher, that action 1) allowed the pitcher to attempt to put the runner on first base out by throwing to first base, but 2) it also freed the runner on third to run. When Mr. Koslowski, the runner on third base, saw the throw going from the pitcher to first base, he broke for home. It’s unclear whether the runner at first was declared out (the throw was bobbled, the runner and fielder collided), but either way, that would have been only the second out, and Mr. Koslowski was able to secure the Tournament championship by stealing home.
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I've been reading some great articles on how current MLB players have trouble adjusting to the defensive shifts. Interestingly, defensive shifts have been around since the 1860s. Maybe not as drastic, but shifts nonetheless. Here are some examples.. there are more out there.. but just to give you a taste.. ...

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