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Doc Adams

Support Doc Adams for the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and read about The Abner Doubleday Myth.

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About the Game

About the Game

We play by the rules and customs of base ball as it was played in the 1860s.

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For some of us, we are heading into our off seasons as winter approaches. For others, generally in the south, they may just be starting up their seasons. For the same reason the northerners take off for the cold of winter, the southerners take off for the heat of summer !

Games I am sure will be starting up in Florida, Arizona, Texas, southern California. Are there others ?

So if you are just getting underway, or have a winter season planned, keep us up to date. While some of us sit and wait for spring, we can live vicariously through you folks from the southern states. 🙂 and maybe even some will catch a plane and come join you .. if you will have us..

Also, it is a good time to catch up on some reading. If you really want to understand the history of the game, and how it was really played, there are some good books out there.

I can recommend a few that stick to the history:

Baseball before we knew it. David Block
Baseball's First Inning. William Ryczek
Baseball in the Garden of Eden. John Thorn

Then, take some time to research game accounts from newspapers. So many are digitized these days, they are easy to find. Game accounts from the 1850s and 1860s can tell you so much about how the New York game was played, to help you understand how to better portray your own clubs playing style. Try not to mix town ball with Massachusetts ball with New York ball with your own modern adds and call it a game as it was played in that era. Try to be true to the history. Show those early pioneers of the game the respect they so deserve. "Good people" make the game fun. You dont need the "extras" to get people's attention.

if you need help, the VBBA Rules and Customs committee is here to help you. They have tons of years of experience researching and interpreting the New York game, and they do so without regard to region so they are a very unbiased group that can help you play the game as it was played in the 19th century. They can be reached via the vbba.org website, or just drop a message here and I will get it to them.

Dont waste the off season. Get yourselves ready for 2019. Keep your bodies and your minds in shape !

For the love of the game.
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Good news for Doc... ...

Doc Adams signs unveiled at Lamson Farm Day in Mont Vernon, NH! Soon to be posted. And thanks to all those who contributed to these two beautiful sign. We appreciate your support so much.

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VBBA - Vintage Base Ball Association shared Daniel Lucius "Doc" Adams's post. ...

Doc Adams signs unveiled at Lamson Farm Day in Mont Vernon, NH! Soon to be posted. And thanks to all those who contributed to these two beautiful sign. We appreciate your support so much.

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Looking for a game to play on Sept 21-23 ? Head to Branson, MO and join in on the fun as they present the Legacy Cup 2018. Plenty of opportunities for base ball during this event, and you can come as just a single player or a pair of players, and find a team to hook up with. More info upon request or contact event organizer Doug Ernst at quickstepsmanager@gmail.com for lots more info on the event. Get more base ball in before the bad weather finds us !! ...

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A post copied from another page that I found interesting enough to share to back up why we encourage people to play a FULL nine innings in the 1860s that most of us play.

Thank you Richard Hershberger for sharing.

Boston Globe March 3, 1874, reporting on the NA meeting of the previous day. This snippet is from the rules discussion, on the proposal to give clubs the option of skipping the bottom of the ninth if the batting side had the lead. While this idea was controversial, we (sadly) are not told the substance of the argument against it. My guess is kneejerk conservatism. In any case, the idea wasn't incorporated in the rules until A. G. Mills's revisions for 1880.

The 1874 rules as adopted did include the innovation that a game called on account of rain, with the top half completed and the team batting in the bottom half ahead, did not revert to the last completed inning's score. This was to reduce stalling by a trailing team in the face of imminent rain. I suspect that the two proposals, while not directly related, were inspired concurrently.

The rule set was drafted by Chadwick. He had no formal position in the NA, but he was still a respected authority, not yet regarded as an old coot. He also had access to a printing press, so he could pass out copies of his draft rules, hinting about how convenient it would be to simply adopt them verbatim. The NA didn't take that bait. This was the year that his ten-man ten-inning was brought to a vote. It went down in flames.
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