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We play by the rules and customs of base ball as it was played in the 1860s.

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Next up in the 1860 Beadles Dime Rule Book, is a little ditty about the Batsman. Some good advice here. Make note, the reference to the penalty of sec 37.. it isnt spelled out here, but it just means the umpire can warn the striker for deliberately not swinging at fair pitches, and then call strikes. I have heard many people say in 1860, the only way to get a strike is to swing and miss. This is not true. Most modern vintage players arent that picky, so it isnt often an umpire needs to warn, but is CAN happen, and DID happen.. so dont forget about that.

Also note the encouragement NOT to stand and wait for your teammate to advance a base (steal). It can be an annoying part of the game. This is pointed out, and it was a point of play that upset Chadwick, and he wanted to vent a bit here.

It also touches on "tagging up". If you just read section 16 by itself, you might be swayed to believe you could NOT tag up.. that language was cleared up later, but this section shows what they meant for that to mean...that tagging up is just fine in 1860.

Anyway.. read up on the Batsman, as found in Beadles.

For the love of the game.
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A gentleman is looking to start a club in Rutland, VT. Anyone near this location that might know some people to jump on board, please let us know. Also, if your club is within a couple hours, and you might be able to help them get going, or even head to their place for some practices or games, let us know. At this point, i am not sure if there are any clubs in Vermont... as our map is a bit outdated, but.. lets see if we can help these guys out and put an end to no clubs in that great state !

For the love of the game..

and please feel free to share...
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Lets get back to the 1860 Beadles. We have covered all the bases (pun intended) as well as the outfield positions, so what is next. After the positions, Chadwick explains some finer points of how to play the game.

In this excerpt, he talks about fielding. What makes this interesting, is that he sums in up in one sentence, and then spends the rest of the entire write up about how manly it is to catch the ball "on the fly" !, instead of letting it bound. I just found that interesting. Not a lot of "finer points" to learn here.

Keep in mind, this is 1860 Beadles, and bound rule didnt go away until the 1865 season.

A true "on the fly" bigot. The way the book was published it ends up on two pages, therefore, two pictures.
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Today lets cover the outfielders in 1860 base ball. As you read this, you will find Chadwick didn't have much to say about outfielders. The net is.. fast, good arm, good hands.

But, he made sure to point out the worst player goes to right field per his comment. I am going to "presume" he says this since in the early days,. players that went to the opposite field were not the majority. Could they ? sure, a few probably were adept at it.

In today's modern vintage game, so many clubs have many players that are capable of going the opposite way, so all outfield spots require a solid player.

When you read some of Chadwicks other comments, he talks about batters that "face to a field" to which they would hit. This just means they turn their body or indicate such that they are aiming the other way, which probably made it easier to defend in the day, if you kind of knew it was coming.

Today, a good hitter can just wait a bit on an outside pitch and drive it that way, without giving away what he is doing.

With that said, all three outfield spots are a bit more equally important in our modern game, but I think most would agree the left fielder still makes the most plays on outfield balls.

Do any clubs shuttle outfielders around based on who is batting ? or do you just run with them as they are placed at the beginning of the inning as they did in the 1860s.
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